PREVENGE

6.5 out of 10

Release date:  10th February 2017

Director: Alice Lowe

Cast: Alice Lowe, Jo Hartley, Kayvan Novak, Tom Davis, Gemma Whelan, Mike Wozniak, Tom Meeten, Leila Hoffman, Marc Bessant with Kate Dickie and Dan Renton Skinner

Writer: Alice Lowe

Trailer: PREVENGE

Prevenge-Movie-Poster

Actress Alice Lowe (THE GHOUL) makes her directorial with this inscrutable comedy-horror set in Cardiff. Pregnant Ruth’s (LOWE) baby no longer has a father after a freak accident lead to his death on an adventure weekend. One day the baby starts to talk to talk to Ruth persuading her to kill some seemingly random people. Is there a connection between them and why do they have to die?

The film is distrubing and stylistic with gallows humour which lands on its feet. It’s gross but repeatedly funny. The gore is unavoidable and visceral, noone escapes if they pay to watch this. It’s only after the film has ended do you begin to question it’s merits. Yes, it’s very entertaining so it gets high marks for delivering what it promises. At the same time its very thin. There are no layers to it. Ruth is a killer with a mental problem who happens to be pregnant. A proxy that she can blame her bloodlust on. Some of her victims like Tom Davis’ (TRADERS) DJ Dan and the pet shop owner, (DAN RENTON SKINNER – THE GHOUL) are utterly appalling characters that deserve their movie fate, whereas some of the others are more sympathetic. The only other character that isn’t an extended cameo is Jo Hartley’s (THIS IS ENGLAND) Midwife. Like a female David Brent, she is wonderfully candid but out of synch with quite how unhinged her patient is. Some of the exchanges between her and Ruth are the best in the film.

Some of the the scenes are well realised with queasy cinematography, gross out filters and an electronic score reminiscent of Tangerine Dream or The Goblins. It’s also good that the locations are pretty much anonymous and could have been set anywhere in Britain. (Apart from the scenes on the Pembrokeshire Coast). A bright script and winsome performances help this directorial debut to fly. It works well as a companion piece to some of Alice Lowe’s other films like Sightseers and Black Mountain Poets.

6.5 out of 10 – Fun while it lasts, but you won’t call it a classic.

WHAT HAVE I SEEN THAT ACTOR IN BEFORE?

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